Meeting # ____ Creativity Curator: Identify and explain how the reading displays

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Jan 9, 2023

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Meeting # ____ Creativity Curator: Identify and explain how the reading displays the importance of creativity or the creative choices of the author by answering at least one of the guiding questions and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the story functions as a dystopia.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how does the story represent the importance of individual or collective creativity or the ability to create?
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2. In the reading so far, what creative choices did the author make to communicate the novel’s message? Were they effective?
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3. In the reading so far, what creative choices did the author make to represent the dystopian setting or other characteristics of a dystopian story? Were they effective?Meeting # ____ Communication Charter: Identify and explain how the reading portrays acts of communication or is an act of communication by answering at least one of the guiding questions and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the story functions as a dystopia.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how does the story represent the impact of an act of communication or failure in communication?
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2. In the reading so far, how does society use communication? (Is it limited / controlled? Discouraged? Who is able to communicate and who is not? What information is communicated and what is not? etc.)
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3. In the reading so far, how is the story itself an act of communication? What is being communicated about our society through the story so far?Meeting # ____ Culture Connector: Identify and explain how the reading connects to real world culture(s) or represents the culture of the society by answering at least one of the guiding questions and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the story functions as a dystopia.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how does the text represent the culture of a particular place, institution or group of people?
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2. In the reading so far, what institutions, traditions, values, beliefs, or philosophies are central to the culture of the society in the story? Why are these important?
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3. In the reading so far, how does the story relate to a particular culture? What is it critiquing about that culture?Meeting # ____ Identity Investigator: Investigate and explain how the reading reveals information on the identities of the characters by answering at least one guiding question and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the protagonist or citizens connect to dystopian characteristics.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how does the story represent the identity of the writer?
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2. In the reading so far, how does the story reveal information about the identity of the protagonist or another character? What are they like and how is their identity important to the story?
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3. In the reading so far, how does the story reveal information about the citizens of the dystopian society? What is revealed about them and why is it important to the story?
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4. In the reading so far, how does the story relate to your identity as a reader?Meeting # ____ Perspective Ponderer: Ponder on and explain what perspectives are portrayed in the reading by answering at least one of the guiding questions and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the story functions as a dystopia.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, what or who’s perspective is represented in the story and how is it represented?
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2. In the reading so far, how is the writer’s perspective represented in the text?
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3. In the reading so far, how is perspective used to present the illusion of utopia as well as reveal and critique the negative aspects of the world in the story? Meeting # ____ Representation Reporter: Report on who / what is represented in the reading and/or how it represents reality by answering at least one guiding question and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the dystopian story is representing and critiquing something in society.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how is the writing and language of the text connected to reality?
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2. In the reading so far, what different themes, people, attitudes or concepts are represented in the text and how?
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3. In the reading so far, to what extent does this story actually represent our society?Meeting # ____ Transformation Tracker: Track and explain how transformation as a concept or acts of transformation is/are present in the reading by answering at least one of the guiding questions and including quotes or passages with page numbers for reference. This can also connect to how the story functions as a dystopia.
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Guiding Questions:
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1. In the reading so far, how does the story represent the idea of transformation or an act of transformation?
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2. In the reading so far, how does the protagonist transform or change? How does the representation of the society transform or change?
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3. In the reading so far, how does the text transform or critique the idea of a utopia or something else in society?
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4. In the reading so far, how does the story transform the reader’s perspective, identity, relationships, goals, values or beliefs?Meeting # ____ Dystopian Delver: Identify and explain how the reading connects to at least two dystopian characteristics (type of dystopian control, societal and civilian characteristics, illusion of utopia, protagonist characteristics etc) and include quotes or page numbers for reference.
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(see the dystopian notes in the ongoing assignments and resources topic of the classroom.)Meeting # ____ Passage Picker (FIDDS): Find one or two paragraphs with page numbers that are moving in some way and are an example of FIDDS (figurative Language, Imagery, Diction, Details, Syntax). Write the first few words of the paragraph with the page #.
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Write why you picked each passage, how it is an example of FIDDS and its impact on the story as a whole.
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For more specific information on and examples of each part of FIDDS, see the FIDDS Packet posted to the “Ongoing Assignments and Resources” topic in google classroom.Meeting #10 Final Analysis: For the final meeting, you will be writing an analysis of the novel as a whole and considering the seven central concepts, FIDDS, and dystopian characteristics. Your analysis should respond to the following questions.
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Analysis Questions:
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1) What dystopian characteristics were used the most in the novel and how were they used to criticize a trend, societal norm, or political system?
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2) What theme (message) is being sent in the novel and how did the author use FIDDS in the story to achieve their message?
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3) Which two central concepts do you think are most connected to the novel and why?FIDDS
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This packet is effective for analyzing all text types; however, when analyzing video, it’s a good idea to find additional features and film techniques
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F is for Figurative Language
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Figurative language is language whose meaning goes beyond the literal sense. The words mean something more than they actually say. A reader has to interpret figurative language.
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There are many types of figurative language such as:
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1. Similes
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Comparisons that use “like” or “as.” EXAMPLE: He ran like the wind.
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2. Metaphors
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Comparisons which are more direct. EXAMPLE: He was the wind.
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3. Personification
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Giving human qualities to nonhuman things. EXAMPLE: The trees whispered to each other.
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4. Hyperbole
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Exaggerations. EXAMPLE: I told you a million times to clean your room.
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5. Idioms
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Slang expressions. EXAMPLE: The old man bit the dust. (“bit the dust” means he died)
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6. Irony
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Expresses meaning through creating an opposite effect. EXAMPLE: If your friend says he doesn’t think you’re going to do well on a test, you might say “Thanks for the vote of confidence.” He didn’t give you such a vote, but rather he had done the opposite. Sarcasm often relies on irony for its effect.
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7. Alliteration
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Repeating the sounds at the beginning of words. EXAMPLE: The brown bears begged for big blue bonbons.
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8. Onomatopoeia
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Words whose sound recreates their meanings. EXAMPLES: bang, snap, crackle, pop, boom, splash, whomp
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9. Allusion
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Is a brief and indirect reference to a person, place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political significance. EXAMPLES: This place is like the Garden of Eden.
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10. Rhetoric
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The art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the use of figures of speech and other compositional techniques. Strands of Rhetoric are Logos, Ethos, and Pathos. EXAMPLES: When at a restaurant, the server suggests, “Can I add some of our delicious sweet potato fries to your entree for just a dollar more?”
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11. Anecdote
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A short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person. EXAMPLES: High school students go around the classroom telling their favorite memories from elementary school.
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12. Vernacular/Dialect
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The language or dialect spoken by the ordinary people in a particular country or region. EXAMPLES: “I’m fixing to do that.”(Southern Phrase) Meaning, “I am going to do that, without a doubt. But not yet.”
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13. Anachronism
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An error in chronology or timeline in a text. Anything or anyone that is out of time of place can be argued as an anachronism. EXAMPLES: a painter paints a portrait of Aristotle and shows him wearing a wrist watch.
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I is for Imagery
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Imagery refers to language that appeals to the senses. Imagery can be based on sight, hearing, touch, taste, or smell.
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Examples:
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It was dark and dim in the forest. – The words “dark” and “dim” are visual images.
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The children were screaming and shouting in the fields. – “Screaming” and “shouting” appeals to our sense of hearing or auditory sense.
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He whiffed the aroma of brewed coffee. – “whiff” and “aroma” evoke our sense of smell or olfactory sense.
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The girl ran her hands on a soft satin fabric. – The idea of touch in this example appeal to our sense of touch or tactile sense.
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The fresh and juicy orange are very cold and sweet. – “fresh and juicy” and “cold and sweet” when associated with oranges have an effect on our sense of taste.
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D is for Diction
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Diction (think of the word “dictionary”) refers to word choice. The simplest division of diction is into the categories of “Formal” (more proper) and “Informal” (more common)
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For example, think of the word “mistake.” Depending on your audience and purpose, you might use different words such as: “screw up” “oversight” “miscalculation” “boo-boo” “error” or “blunder”. Each of those words means about the same thing, but create different tones.
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Look at these two sentences:
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“Methinks the lady doth protest too much” (from Hamlet by William Shakespeare)
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“I think that woman is acting like a fool.”
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Same meaning, different diction.
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Think about the word “child.” Here are some other words that a writer might use
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FORMAL DICTION INFORMAL DICTION
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teenager youth kid young ‘un
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adolescent juvenile rugrat anklebiter
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infant youngster tot punk
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toddler offspring brat squirt
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urchin minor
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Words have denotation (the actual meaning) and connotation (feelings associated with the word). Good writer are aware of the connotation of words, and use those connotations to create emotion in their writing.
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Look at these words: residence, house, home
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Each word has the same basic denotation or definition, but they have different connotations.
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“Residence” is cold and clinic, like a nursing home or a dormitory. It can also be exceedingly formal, like a mansion.
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“House” is a neutral word.
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“Home” is warm and pleasant and comfortable.
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(the second) D is for Details
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The details that a writer provides helps define how readers feel. The level of detail–that is, how specific a writer gets–helps create images and emotions in readers. Often, what a writer leaves out creates as much meaning as what a writer leaves in.
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Look at his passage:
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A single knoll rises out of the plain in Oklahoma. My people, the Kiowas, gave it the name Rainy Mountain. The hardest weather in the world is there. Winter brings blizzards, hot tornadic winds arise in the spring, and in summer the prairie is an anvil’s edge. The grass turns brittle and brown, and it cracks beneath your feet. There are green belts along the rivers and creeks, groves of hickory and pecan, willow and witch hazel. At a distance in July or August the steaming foliage seems almost to writhe in fire. Great green and yellow grasshoppers are everywhere in the tall grass, popping up like corn to sting the flesh, and tortoises crawl about on the red earth, going nowhere in the plenty of time. To look upon that landscape in the early morning, with the sun at your back, is to lose the sense of proportion. Your imagination comes to life, and this, you think, is where Creation was begun.
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–from “The Way to Rainy Mountain” by N. Scott Momaday
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It is the details (in bold) in the passage that help create the feeling of a hard, desolate place.
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S is for Syntax
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Syntax is best understood as the order of words in a sentence. Syntax is an organizational strategy.
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Look at these examples of changing syntax to create an effect.
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“Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.” –JFK
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This sounds better than: “Do not ask what your country can do for you, but instead you should think about what you could do for your country.”
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Here’s another:
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“The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.” –Stephen King
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This sounds better than:
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The gunslinger followed the man in black, who was fleeing across the desert.
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The difference is syntax.
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In King’s version, the reader sees the man in black, then the desert, then the gunslinger, which is exactly how those elements appear.
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Punctuation can also play a role in syntax. For example, in the novel Speak dialogue is punctuated in unique fashion:
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Principal Principal: “Where’s your late pass, mister?”
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Errant Student: “I’m on my way to get one now.”
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PP: “But you can’t be in the hall without a pass.”
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This style of punctuation mimics that of a drama or script instead of a novel or short story. This syntax choice suggests that the characters exist is a drama are playing roles instead of being themselves.

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